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It was a rainy morning, but that didn’t dissuade the runners! The kid’s got the brunt of it, with a downpour just as they were taking off on their one-mile run along the rail trail. All the runners were real troopers!

Thank you to all the runners, the volunteers and businesses that support the Station Loop Ramble. Your financial commitments help with the maintenance and repairs of the Mass Central Rail Trail.

2017 winners or the 5-mile Classic, Kate Fields and Matthew Twarog

2017 winners or the 5-mile Classic, Kate Fields and Matthew Twarog

2017 winner of the 5k Run/Walk is Bailey Metcalf and Aurelia Wilder (not shown)

2017 winner of the 5k Run/Walk is Bailey Metcalf and Aurelia Wilder (not shown)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a 10 minute slide show video with photographs from Brian Miner and Steve Olvio.

Here are the race results:

First Name Last Name Time Town
Matthew Twarog 31:33 Hubbardston
Max Whitney 36:14 Barre
Kate Fields 39:05 Palmer
Mike Duquette 39.26 Shrewsbury
Brian Keleher 40:05 New Braintree
Eugene Rich 40:59 Gilbertville
Brian Patenaude 41:11 West Brookfield
Nicole Keleher 41:53 New Braintree
Tricia Sawyer 43:52 Oakham
Pamela Clark 44:03 West Brookfield
Andrea Roda 44:04 Milford
Kathleen O’Connor 44:25 Holden
Brian Farmer 45:44 Chicopee
Donna Holden 45:53 Hardwick
Jennifer Noorjanian 46:15 Milford
Mei Martin 46:16 West Brookfield
Elaine Dill 46:36 Monson
Richard Matteson 47:24 Westhampton
Evan White 48:15 Hardwick
Robin Langer 48:30 Hubbardston
Jenni DiMauro 48:56 Barre
Stacy Potts 49:33 Barre
Jeff Beker 49:33 Barre
Alan Gray 50:29 Gardner
Melissa Cucchi 50:39 Newton
Christine Palmer 52:45 Gilbertville
Paula Ouimette 52:57 Gilbertville
Jennifer Walters 53:37 West Warren
Edward Currier 56:15 Sturbridge
Marta Carlson 58:13 Paxton
Brandy Murphy 1:00:04 Leicester
5K RUN/WALK
First Name Last Name Time Town
Bailey Metcalf 20:07 Gilbertville
Benjamin Hood 20:43 Hardwick
JR Price 20:45 Washington
William Hood 22:21 Hardwick
Andy Price 22:45 Washington
David Maher 23:04 North Brookfield
Matthew Peabody 23:16 Phillipston
Ed Hood 24:23 Hardwick
Pete Mayes 25:17 New Braintree
Aurelia Wilder 27:43 Barre
Maddie Subik 27:46 Barre
Mark Kablack 28:02 New Braintree
Owen Twarog 28:49 Hubbardston
Jessica Wenke 29:46 Babylon
Richie Springer 31:16 North Brookfield
Lynn Wangeril 31:33 Barre
Amanda Blakie 33:13 Gilbertville
John Toal 34:24 North Brookfield
Jessica Powers 35:41 Ware
David Broschart 36:21 West Brookfield
Rachel McNaugh 38:30 Barre
Jenn DeSimone 39:36 Spencer
Sophia Laprel 39:57 Framingham
Robert Laprel 39:58 Framingham
Sara Subik 41:17 Barre
Jennifer Keaney 44:31 Oakham
Bethany Cogoli 44:31 Oakham
Pamela Robinson 46:53 Hardwick
Fiona Laprel 47.25 Framingham
Louie Gutterman 47:40 North Brookfield
Claudia Broschart 47:42 West Brookfield
Jessica Laprel 47:43 Framingham
Stephanie Korzec 50:09 New Braintree
Julie Bransfield 51:22 Brandon
Sandra McGuill 51:39
Ernest Breor 59:55 East Longmeadow
Doris Farmer 1:00:06 Ware
KID’S ONE MILE
First Name Last Name Time Town
Nathaniel Henshaw 6:38 Templeton
Jamie Paquet 6:55 Petersham
Tim Rodier 6:56 Oxford
Sophia Laprel 7:25 Framingham
Carlee Rich 8:32 Gilbertville
Caitlin Rich 8:32 Gilbertville
Charlotte Carpenter 9:07 Barre
Katie Twarog 9:36 Hubbardston
Sadie Cogoli 10:28 Oakham
Quinn Ouimette 11:11 Gilbertville
Connor Cogoli 12:09 Oakham
Cora Wangerin 13:33 Barre
Sadie Ouimette 13:50 Gilbertville
Rosalynn Cogoli 13:53 Oakham
Zack Cogoli 14:06 Oakham
Clara Cogoli 14:41 Oakham
Penny Ouimette 16:49 Gilbertville

The group pausing for a picture on the footbridge over Nelson Brook.

The group pausing for a picture on the footbridge over Nelson Brook.

A group of 17 hikers left the parking area at Harvard Forest on Sunday morning to begin the trek down to Tom Swamp. The trail is named after Bob Marshall, a former graduate student at the Harvard Forest and founder of The Wilderness Society (among other professional accomplishments) back in the 1930s. While completing his research, Bob would hike through the woods to his study site. This trail is meant to approximate how he might have gotten down to the Tom Swamp area. Sections of the trail still need approval to formally clear the trail and open it to the public. We traveled across permanently conserved properties along the way, and saw a variety of natural and cultural history pieces too. The humidity made it a challenge, but we mostly walked in the shade under the trees.

One of many piles of moose scat found along the trail.

One of many piles of moose scat found along the trail.

A moose skull. There were many bones found in the area including vertebra, thigh, shoulder and ribs.

A moose skull. There were many bones found in the area including vertebra, thigh, shoulder and ribs.

 

 

 

Parts of an old wood stove are out along the trail. Bob surmised that these are the remains of a stile left-over from Prohibition days.

Parts of an old wood stove are out along the trail. Bob surmised that these are the remains of a stile left-over from Prohibition days.

 

Looking at part of Harvard Pond from the Tom Swamp Road.

Looking at part of Harvard Pond from the Tom Swamp Road.

The shrubs have grown, blocking the view into Tom Swamp, but we tried to see northerly anyway. You could make out a stand of planted red pines  in the distance.

The shrubs have grown, blocking the view into Tom Swamp, but we tried to see northerly anyway. You could make out a stand of planted red pines in the distance.

 

 

 

Signs about Town

signs about townThese signs are out and about in the East Quabbin communities. Don’t miss this great event and all the proceeds goes towards maintenance of the Mass Central Rail Trail and other preserves.

Bring your family and friends to the Station Loop Ramble on Sunday, October 8th!

For full details go to StationLoopRamble.EQLT.org

 

Here's what Holly had to say about the 2016 Station Loop Ramble. Wont you join her on Sunday, October 8th for this year's run and walk events? See you then!

Here’s what Holly had to say about the 2016 Station Loop Ramble. Wont you join her on Sunday, October 8th for this year’s run and walk events? See you then!

 

Caught these hard workers after they cleared the stone wall along the boundary.

Caught these hard workers after they cleared the stone wall along the boundary.

Thanks to the hard work of Harrison, Jeff, Carina, Ann, Becky, Elisabeth, Darrell, James, Richie, Sterling, Jake, Dave and Cynthia, the view from McCarthy Road in North Brookfield is opened up.

These students help clear brush along McCarthy Road and pile fallen branches to clean up the field.

These students help clear brush along McCarthy Road and pile fallen branches to clean up the field.

The Wendemuth Meadow work-day focused on the McCarthy Road end of the property.  The gate was installed, so now the entrance is more inviting to walkers, horse-back riders and bicyclers, AND we can easily access the property for maintenance. New signage at the gate will be ordered!

20170729_095353webMost of us worked to clear the brush from that field. Harrison had brush-hogged much of the area, but there’s a lot of rocks and stumps still, so plenty of work to do with loppers and weed whackers.20170729_095214web Hope you head out to Wendemuth and enjoy the area!

John O'Keefe talking to the Leadership Circle members about the dioramas at Harvard Forest.

John O’Keefe talking to the Leadership Circle members about the dioramas at Harvard Forest.

Yesterday members of EQLT’s Leadership Circle got a guided tour through the newly renovated Fisher Museum at the Harvard Forest in Petersham.  John O’Keefe, retired Museum Director and EQLT member, shared his insights on the changes to New England forests over the past several centuries, the original goal of Dr. Fisher and Harvard University in establishing the Harvard Forest at the beginning of forestry in the US during the early 1900s, and the terrific artistry of the dioramas.

20170625_145115webThere are over 20 dioramas, basically 3′ x 3′ three dimensional depictions of a typical landscape. The first group of them recount the major forest transformations, from pre-colonial woods and the first settlement farms, to the height of agriculture in mid-1800s, farm abandonment and forest regrowth and subsequent harvesting. The sequence ends in 1930 when the dioramas were originally built.

20170625_144310webOther dioramas depict different silvocultural strategies to weed, thin and regenerate New England’s regrowing woods. There’s also a terrific diorama of Harvard Pond. Each diorama is filled with unique details, and a scavenger hunt encourages visitors to look deeply at them all. Where is the squirrel, wood pecker, two jackets on a rock, bee hives, cattails and much more. It’s definitely worth a visit to the Fisher Museum, which is open on weekend afternoons and staffed by volunteers.

The base of the Witness Tree, a 100 year old red oak that is the central character in Lynda Mapes' book Witness Tree

The base of the Witness Tree, a 100 year old red oak that is the central character in Lynda Mapes’ book Witness Tree

We also took a short walk on the grounds to learn a bit more about the current research at Harvard Forest and see the Witness Tree.  The Witness Tree is the central character in a newly published book by Lynda V. Mapes, as she details the forest changes over the past century or so with a particular eye on how climate change is impacting the wooded landscape. The Witness Tree is a fascinating read; and we will be hosting a book discussion this fall and hope to have Lynda join us too.

20170625_155729web

Camping Out!

We collected a lot of downed branches to keep the fire going. The kids even re-kindled the flames in the morning to toast bagels.

We collected a lot of downed branches to keep the fire going. The kids even re-kindled the flames in the morning to toast bagels.

The weather was pretty perfect for our first-ever EQLT sponsored camping trip. This time we slept out at the Coxhall Kitchen Garden. Everyone was impressed with the size of the stone wall enclosure, and amazed that it was built back in 1774 to be a kitchen garden, which was popular back in England at the time.

The day was warm, with a gentle breeze. At one point late in the afternoon the clouds looked a bit threatening, but we didn’t get rained on. The clouds cleared out so we could see the stars, with the big dipper directly overhead. It was a magical experience for the eleven kids who joined in the fun.

20170610_180349webA group of us walked the trail loop – over to Fish Brook, the hay field and overlook ledge. On the way we found a huge mushroom, plenty of scat, lots of animal holes, and a toad! Great fun for all involved. Thank you to all the parents and adults that made this such a successful event. We’ll be planning other local camping opportunities 20170610_175503webin the future!

 

 

 

 

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