Feed on
Posts
Comments
The group pausing for a picture on the footbridge over Nelson Brook.

The group pausing for a picture on the footbridge over Nelson Brook.

A group of 17 hikers left the parking area at Harvard Forest on Sunday morning to begin the trek down to Tom Swamp. The trail is named after Bob Marshall, a former graduate student at the Harvard Forest and founder of The Wilderness Society (among other professional accomplishments) back in the 1930s. While completing his research, Bob would hike through the woods to his study site. This trail is meant to approximate how he might have gotten down to the Tom Swamp area. Sections of the trail still need approval to formally clear the trail and open it to the public. We traveled across permanently conserved properties along the way, and saw a variety of natural and cultural history pieces too. The humidity made it a challenge, but we mostly walked in the shade under the trees.

One of many piles of moose scat found along the trail.

One of many piles of moose scat found along the trail.

A moose skull. There were many bones found in the area including vertebra, thigh, shoulder and ribs.

A moose skull. There were many bones found in the area including vertebra, thigh, shoulder and ribs.

 

 

 

Parts of an old wood stove are out along the trail. Bob surmised that these are the remains of a stile left-over from Prohibition days.

Parts of an old wood stove are out along the trail. Bob surmised that these are the remains of a stile left-over from Prohibition days.

 

Looking at part of Harvard Pond from the Tom Swamp Road.

Looking at part of Harvard Pond from the Tom Swamp Road.

The shrubs have grown, blocking the view into Tom Swamp, but we tried to see northerly anyway. You could make out a stand of planted red pines  in the distance.

The shrubs have grown, blocking the view into Tom Swamp, but we tried to see northerly anyway. You could make out a stand of planted red pines in the distance.

 

 

 

Comments are closed.